Here’s some background:

In March 2010, Kyle Mizokami – an ordinary man except for his passion for Japanese security issues – started Japan Security Watch. Examining the peculiarities of a nation with an unconstitutional military heavily reliant on its alliance with the US, Kyle built up a strong niche readership based on his light-hearted yet passionate posts and love of media.

During that year, Kyle founded the New Pacific Institute with Dr. Craig Hooper, at that point a blogger at Next Navy. Based in San Francisco, the New Pacific Institute is a collection of bloggers with a deep interest in the security politics of the Asia-Pacific. Japan Security Watch became the focus of this collective as it gathered momentum – starting with myself in February 2011, following up with the superb Corey Wallace of σ1 a month later. We changed the blog, its content, its style, through a merger of our interests and styles. With a steady niche readership carved out for us at Japan Security Watch, we then started to look further afield.

In November 2011, we started the first phase of this process: Asia Security Watch posts at JSW. We recruited talented and passionate individuals to cover Korea (Craig Scanlan) and China (Wilson Chau and Adam Elkus), and they did excellent work over what would otherwise have been a very slow holiday period. Hopefully you have all had a taste of their work and are as excited as we are that today we enter the second phase of our expansion – a dedicated blog run by the same team as JSW, and joined by Sheryn Lee and Ray Kwong. We look forward to bringing you the same passionate coverage that we have worked towards here at JSW, albeit covering a wider range of countries and issues.

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A former contributor to World Intelligence (Japan Military Review), James Simpson joined Japan Security Watch in 2011, migrating with his blog Defending Japan. He has a Masters in Security Studies from Aberystwyth University and is currently living in Kawasaki, Japan. His primary interests include the so-called 'normalization' of Japanese security (i.e. militarization), and the political impact of the abduction issue with North Korea.
James Simpson has 9 post(s) on Asia Security Watch